FacebookGoogle PlusLinkedIn

Archive

Archive for the ‘Company Updates’ Category

Nissan new technology allows car to read your mind to boost reaction times

Thursday, January 4th, 2018

Nissan’s latest research project is ‘brain-to-vehicle’ (aka ‘B2V’) tech that could have your next car anticipating your driving reactions before you can even translate them into a turn of the wheel or applying the brake. The neural interface, which can not only improve reaction times, but also manage cabin comforts based on signals it takes from your brain, is one of the things Nissan will be showing off at CES this year.

The automaker shared a look at its B2V tech ahead of the show, demonstrating how it improves reaction times by around 0.2 to 0.5 seconds, which, while a seemingly small period of time, could actually make a big difference on the road, where split-second decision-making can mean the difference between accidents and narrowly avoiding the same.

Anticipating things like braking, applying the accelerator, or anticipating turns, Nissan could develop great advanced driver assistance (ADAS) features, or it could help bridge the gap between semi-autonomous and autonomous vehicles more safely. It could also help with non-driving functions; Nissan imagines being able to detect discomfort from a driver, which could lead to changing the way the vehicle drives in order to fit the driver’s expectations – and potentially using augmented reality to change what the driver sees to make the driving environment more amenable to safe conduct on the road.

Nissan will show off aspects of the tech using a driving simulator at CES, so attendees will get a chance to see what this cold look like in practice. It sounds like the premise for a ‘Black Mirror’ episode, but it could be something that improves ADAS now and paves the way for much smarter and more capable fully autonomous driving down the road, thanks to the data it provides.

“All Your Company Information Technology Needs Under One Company”

3355 Lenox Road Atlanta, GA 30326

www.itgurusatl.comcustomerservice@itgurusatl.com|

(888) 511-0143 OR (706) 406-5914

“As a registered SAM.gov company, we service government entities across the entire US and Canada”

“LIKE” us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/itgurusatl / “FOLLOW US” on Twitter: www.twitter.com/itgurusatl / “CONNECT” with us on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/itgurusofatlanta/

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSFEED AND UPDATES AT: http://eepurl.com/cU_t7r

Apple devices saw the most activations for the holidays again

Tuesday, January 2nd, 2018

Apple devices accounted for 44 percent of smartphone and tablet activations over the holidays, with nearly a third of those coming from new devices including the iPhone 8, 8 Plus and X, according to new data Analytics out this morning. However, the iPhone 7 and iPhone 6 actually took the top two spots in terms of Apple activations, at 15.1 percent and 14.9 percent, respectively. New report analyzed the holiday period by examining the activations throughout the week leading up to Christmas and the end of Chanukah. It also found that Samsung’s activation rate had climbed 5 percent from last year, likely because of the launch of the Galaxy S8. But the manufacturer only made up 26 percent of all 2017 holiday activations, compared with Apple’s 44 percent the same percentage Apple achieved last year, in fact.

Google, meanwhile, was missing from the list of top devices over the holiday season, despite the arrival of the Pixel 2. This, at first, is seemingly in contradiction to Localytics’ new report on holiday activations, also out today, which claims that Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL devices saw the largest lift in activations, even outpacing the iPhoneX. However, Localytics’ data is from the U.S. only, and looked at a different time frame Christmas Weekend in the U.S., including Christmas Day. Meanwhile, Flurry’s report examines activations worldwide. This paints two different pictures of the market. That global viewpoint also explains why older iPhone models came out on top in analysis.

The firm points out the high number of iPhone 6 and 7 activations are largely due to the affordability of the older models and their availability in markets outside the U.S. But it’s still fairly remarkable to see a device like the iPhone 6, which Apple relaunched to international resellers in spring 2017, seeing so many new activations. That points to a sizable market that’s choosing an iPhone based on cost, primarily. Beyond Apple and Samsung, other top device makers seeing activations in the week leading up to Christmas included Huawei, Xiaomi, Motorola, LG, OPPO, and Vivo. Like the iPhone 6, they too, represent the “affordable” smartphone market, but from the Android side. This is also the first year that Vivo made this chart, a change attributed to its growth in China and India.

Along with the new activations, app install rates got their usual holiday bump as well. Flurry once again saw two times as many app installs on Christmas Day than on an average day in December. The top types of apps being installed included Messaging & Social, Games, Music, Media & Entertainment, and Kids & Family apps.

“All Your Company Information Technology Needs Under One Company”

3355 Lenox Road Atlanta, GA 30326

www.itgurusatl.comcustomerservice@itgurusatl.com|

(888) 511-0143 OR (706) 406-5914

“As a registered SAM.gov company, we service government entities across the entire US and Canada”

“LIKE” us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/itgurusatl / “FOLLOW US” on Twitter: www.twitter.com/itgurusatl / “CONNECT” with us on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/itgurusofatlanta/

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSFEED AND UPDATES AT: http://eepurl.com/cU_t7r

Google retires the Pixel C tablet to focus on the Pixelbook

Friday, December 29th, 2017

Google has stopped selling the Pixel C through its online store. It’s a quiet and not unexpected end for the company’s well-received tablet, designed to make room for Google’s latest and greatest. The company confirmed that the end of sale also represents the end of life for the device, though Google added that it plans to continue supporting the hardware moving forward.

“As is common when a device has been out for a few years, we’re now retiring Pixel C and it is no longer available for sale,” the company said in a statement. “However, we are committed to updating and supporting it, including the recent update to Android 8.0, so customers can continue to get the best out of their device.”

And, of course, the statement wouldn’t be complete without a plug for its new premium Chromebook. “Our newly launched Google Pixelbook combines the best parts of a laptop and a tablet for those looking for a versatile device.” Frederic gave the tablet good marks in a review back in 2015, but noted, “There is a market for the C, but I think it’ll be a small one.” That seems to be the case with many of the Google-branded devices, which means the company is essentially competing against itself for a relatively small slice of market share.

The shift from the C to Pixelbook does represent something of a larger trend for the industry in recent years, as many have moved from slates to convertibles. The Pixelbook isn’t as slim as a standalone tablet, and there are certain sacrifices when shifting between any form factors, but it’s a pretty solid tablet replacement for most instances. It’s also a much more well-rounded computing device. The one big caveat here, however, is price. The Pixel C started at $599 (plus keyboard); the Pixelbook’s lowest SKU is $999. The tablets of the future are going to be much more versatile than their predecessors, and it’s definitely going to cost you.

“All Your Company Information Technology Needs Under One Company”

3355 Lenox Road Atlanta, GA 30326

www.itgurusatl.comcustomerservice@itgurusatl.com|

(888) 511-0143 OR (706) 406-5914

“As a registered SAM.gov company, we service government entities across the entire US and Canada”

“LIKE” us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/itgurusatl / “FOLLOW US” on Twitter: www.twitter.com/itgurusatl / “CONNECT” with us on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/itgurusofatlanta/

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSFEED AND UPDATES AT: http://eepurl.com/cU_t7r

The Ambulance fleet using Drones in the future

Wednesday, December 27th, 2017

It’s that time of year again. Sleigh bells overhead and our jolly, bearded benefactor wafting gifts down the chimney to eagerly awaiting hands. We’ve heard every version of this tale. Except, perhaps, the variant that is currently playing out in East Africa. In the funny way that magic tales and science fiction sometimes become reality, if you swap out sleigh bells for drones and gifts for emergency medical supplies, you’ve got the real world tale of Zipline, a company delivering 20% of national blood supply via drone in Rwanda. The Sequoia and A16Z-backed company recently announced it would be expanding operations to neighboring Tanzania.

Meanwhile, here in the U.S. the drone sleigh bells are few and far between, hampered by our aviation regulatory framework, which has not kept pace. In October the Trump Administration signed an executive order giving local governments more leeway to conduct unmanned drone tests. The order allows local governments and communities to work with industry to design their own trial programs and apply to the Federal Aviation Administration for waivers to the existing rules. “Our nation will move faster, fly higher, and soar proudly toward the next great chapter of American aviation” said Trump. The direction was the right one. But there has been little follow up and the rate of progress remains lightyears behind other countries, prompting Amazon and Google to head overseas to the UK and Australia to conduct drone tests the past few years.

In an interview for Flux podcast I sat down with Keller Rinaudo, the CEO of Zipline, for a wide-ranging conversation about government policy, innovation and the future of autonomous infrastructure. We got into how he thinks the U.S. government has become ossified and what it would take to become a leader in this space. He also shares how he’s built a successful partnership with UPS, dealt with naysayers, and how he thinks about risk. At the heart of the Zipline story is real-world grit, a dedicated team, cutting-edge technology, and a government bold enough to take risks. An excerpt of the conversation is published below. Zipline is looking to build instant delivery for the planet and our mission is to deliver urgent medical products to people in difficult to reach and remote places. Today we’re operating at national scale in Rwanda. We’re delivering a significant percentage of the national blood supply on a day to day basis and we allow hospitals across the country to get instant access to any blood product that a patient needs on either a routine or an emergency basis.

In the long run the goal is to be serving all healthcare facilities across Rwanda. Something like 40 hospitals. Then there are an additional 400 health centers that don’t do blood transfusions but do need access to a whole host of medical products that are hard to get access to. In the long run the vision of the Rwandan government is to put each of their 13 million citizens within a 15 minute delivery of any essential medical product they could need.

“All Your Company Information Technology Needs Under One Company”

3355 Lenox Road Atlanta, GA 30326

www.itgurusatl.comcustomerservice@itgurusatl.com|

(888) 511-0143 OR (706) 406-5914

“As a registered SAM.gov company, we service government entities across the entire US and Canada”

“LIKE” us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/itgurusatl / “FOLLOW US” on Twitter: www.twitter.com/itgurusatl / “CONNECT” with us on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/itgurusofatlanta/

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSFEED AND UPDATES AT: http://eepurl.com/cU_t7r

HAVEN APP turns any Android phone into a surveillance system

Tuesday, December 26th, 2017

NSA Whistleblower Edward Snowden is among the backers of a new surveillance app that helps guard against computer hijackings. Haven is an open source app that will run on any Android phone, particularly inexpensive and older devices. It operates like a surveillance system, using the device’s camera, audio recording capability and even accelerometer to detect movement and notify a user. The idea is that, even with the best encryption in the world, a device is vulnerability to physical, in-person tampering also known as “evil maid” because literally a hotel maid could access it.

The app was developed by The Guardian Project, Freedom Of The Press and Snowden to offer eyes and ears to prevent, or at least increase awareness, of whether a device has been tampered with. “Haven can also be used as a cheap home or office security system to detect break-ins or vandalism while you’re away, positioning the phone to send you photographs when someone walks within range. Or you can use it to monitor for wildlife in rural areas, or to capture evidence of human rights violations and disappearances,” Lee wrote.

So, for example, you’d set up a burner Android device in a hotel safe alongside your laptop. Haven could then be set to broadcast any audio or movement, basically if anyone opened the safe it will snap a photo, record audio and detect motion. Alerts can be sent via SMS, Signal or to a Tor-based website. Writing for The Intercept, Micah Lee, a member of Freedom Of The Press who help set up and test the app, admitted that the app does have some shortcomings — such as maintaining constant internet access for notifications, preventing battery drain and false positives — but it offers something new for those who would welcome the peace of mind from additional surveillance. While beyond helping keep hardware secure, it could also have other uses.

Haven can be downloaded via Google Play and open source Android app store F-Droid. Snowden, who remains exiled in Russia, previously helped develop an iPhone case that detects when a device is transmitting data that can put users at risk of detection, and he’s been very vocal about services that he believes are problematic for privacy. He previously advised that people get rid of Dropbox and avoid using Google and Facebook and has spoken at length on why data collection is “the central problem of the future.”

“All Your Company Information Technology Needs Under One Company”

3355 Lenox Road Atlanta, GA 30326

www.itgurusatl.comcustomerservice@itgurusatl.com|

(888) 511-0143 OR (706) 406-5914

“As a registered SAM.gov company, we service government entities across the entire US and Canada”

“LIKE” us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/itgurusatl / “FOLLOW US” on Twitter: www.twitter.com/itgurusatl / “CONNECT” with us on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/itgurusofatlanta/

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSFEED AND UPDATES AT: http://eepurl.com/cU_t7r

Apple slows down old iPhones to prevent shutdowns

Friday, December 22nd, 2017

Apple deliberately prevents chips in older iPhones from reaching their full processing power under certain conditions, the company has confirmed. The company claims this only happens for phones whose batteries have degraded and that the measure is necessary to prevent those phones from shutting down unexpectedly. The issue arose after a developer, published a study that looked at how benchmarks of specific iPhone models could vary wildly, depending on what software it was running, with many individual phones performing much worse than the “standard” benchmark established when the phone was brand new.

The lithium-ion batteries in smartphones and other devices degrade a little every time they are charged and discharged. Day to day, the degradation is negligible, but after a year or longer, users tend to notice the device no longer holds a charge as long as it used to, and particularly processor-heavy tasks can sometimes cause a smartphone battery to discharge rapidly. Poole founded Primate Labs, which created Geekbench, the smartphone benchmark tests that are the de facto industry standard, and his assessment looks at the iPhone 6S and iPhone 7 specifically. He found that the degraded performance with some began with iOS 10.2.1, which Apple released in January 2017 and was specifically supposed to address the problem of random shutdowns in the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6S.

Per Poole’s analysis, that update apparently did not affect the iPhone 7, but iOS 11.2, released in early December, did. While the effect doesn’t appear to be as widespread as with iOS 10.2.1, that could be because some iPhone 7 owners may not have updated yet, or if they have, may simply not have done as many benchmarks with Geekbench. Poole agrees with the conclusion of the Reddit thread that inspired his study: That Apple introduced “throttling” for devices whose batteries have degraded, probably to prevent them from shutting down unexpectedly when the battery still shows significant capacity. It’s an understandable trade-off random shutdowns are arguably more frustrating than just generally slow performance though Apple appears to have been less than transparent with its customers about what that trade-off was.

Some Reddit users whose phones were slowed down said they saw improved performance when they replaced the battery, which requires visiting an Apple Store or sending the phone to Apple. However, since iPhone users wouldn’t know why their device is slowing down and may not even know they can replace the battery, they are much more likely to replace the entire device.

“All Your Company Information Technology Needs Under One Company”

3355 Lenox Road Atlanta, GA 30326

www.itgurusatl.comcustomerservice@itgurusatl.com|

(888) 511-0143 OR (706) 406-5914

“As a registered SAM.gov company, we service government entities across the entire US and Canada”

“LIKE” us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/itgurusatl / “FOLLOW US” on Twitter: www.twitter.com/itgurusatl / “CONNECT” with us on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/itgurusofatlanta/

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSFEED AND UPDATES AT: http://eepurl.com/cU_t7r

GOOGLE MAPS NEW DESIGN

Wednesday, December 20th, 2017

Google previewed a redesigned look for Maps that makes it easier to find venues around you. The new design will be rolling out “over the next few weeks” and will appear in Google Maps’ website and apps, as well as third-party services that use Google Maps. With the update, Google Maps will subtly change based on what you’re doing. If you’re using navigation, for example, the app will highlight locations you’re more likely to need while driving, like gas stations. Likewise, if you’re looking at transit directions, Maps will point to bus stops and public transportation stops. Google is also updating the color scheme it uses to identify business locations on the map, to make it easier to find specific types of venues. With the update, the type of business will determine the color of its icon on the map. Restaurants and other venues that fall into the “Food & Drink” category will be orange, while “shopping” will be blue, and “Entertainment/Leisure” will be teal. It may sound like a small change, but Google says these visual cues will make it easier and faster to find places when you’re in an unfamiliar area.

The world is an ever-evolving place. And as it changes, Google Maps changes with it. As roads close, businesses open, or local events happen in your neighborhood, you’ll see it on Google Maps. When you schedule an event using Google Calendar, get a reservation confirmation in Gmail, or add a restaurant to your “Want to Go” list, Google Maps reflects that too. Now, we’re updating Google Maps with a new look that better reflects your world, right now. First, we’ve updated the driving, navigation, transit and explore maps to better highlight the information most relevant to each experience (think gas stations for navigation, train stations for transit, and so on). We’ve also updated our color scheme and added new icons to help you quickly identify exactly what kind of point of interest you’re looking at. Places like a cafe, church, museum or hospital will have a designated color and icon, so that it’s easy to find that type of destination on the map. For example, if you’re in a new neighborhood and searching for a coffee shop, you could open the map to find the nearest orange icon (which is the color for Food & Drink spots).

You’ll see these changes over the next few weeks in all Google products that incorporate Google Maps, including the Assistant, Search, Earth, and Android Auto. Over time, the new style will also appear in the apps, websites and experiences offered by companies that use Google Maps APIs as well. So no matter how or where you’re using Google Maps, you’ll have the same consistent experience.

“All Your Company Information Technology Needs Under One Company”

3355 Lenox Road Atlanta, GA 30326

www.itgurusatl.comcustomerservice@itgurusatl.com|

(888) 511-0143 OR (706) 406-5914

“As a registered SAM.gov company, we service government entities across the entire US and Canada”

“LIKE” us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/itgurusatl / “FOLLOW US” on Twitter: www.twitter.com/itgurusatl / “CONNECT” with us on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/itgurusofatlanta/

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSFEED AND UPDATES AT: http://eepurl.com/cU_t7r

DNA has gone Digital

Wednesday, December 13th, 2017

University scientists, industry stakeholders and government agents have begun gathering to discuss these threats. We’ve even hosted FBI agents from the Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate here at Colorado State University and previously at Virginia Tech for crash courses on synthetic biology and the associated cyberbiosecurity risks. A year ago, we participated in a U.S. Department of Defense-funded project to assess the security of biotechnology infrastructures. The results are classified, but we disclose some of the lessons learned in our new Trends in Biotechnology paper. Biology is becoming increasingly digitized. Researchers like us use computers to analyze DNA, operate lab equipment and store genetic information. But new capabilities also mean new risks – and biologists remain largely unaware of the potential vulnerabilities that come with digitizing biotechnology. he emerging field of cyberbiosecurity explores the whole new category of risks that come with the increased use of computers in the life sciences.

In 2010, a nuclear plant in Iran experienced mysterious equipment failures. Months later, a security firm was called in to troubleshoot an apparently unrelated problem. They found a malicious computer virus. The virus, called Stuxnet, was telling the equipment to vibrate. The malfunction shut down a third of the plant’s equipment, stunting development of the Iranian nuclear program. Unlike most viruses, Stuxnet didn’t target only computers. It attacked equipment controlled by computers. The marriage of computer science and biology has opened the door for amazing discoveries. With the help of computers, we’re decoding the human genome, creating organisms with new capabilities, automating drug development and revolutionizing food safety. Stuxnet demonstrated that cybersecurity breaches can cause physical damages. What if those damages had biological consequences? Could bioterrorists target government laboratories studying infectious diseases? What about pharmaceutical companies producing lifesaving drugs? As life scientists become more reliant on digital workflows, the chances are likely rising.

The ease of accessing genetic information online has democratized science, enabling amateur scientists in community laboratories to tackle challenges like developing affordable insulin. But the line between physical DNA sequences and their digital representation is becoming increasingly blurry. Digital information, including malware, can now be stored and transmitted via DNA. The J. Craig Venter Institute even created an entire synthetic genomewatermarked with encoded links and hidden messages. Twenty years ago, genetic engineers could only create new DNA molecules by stitching together natural DNA molecules. Today scientists can use chemical processes to produce synthetic DNA. The sequence of these molecules is often generated using software. In the same way that electrical engineers use software to design computer chipsand computer engineers use software to write computer programs, genetic engineers use software to design genes. With the help of computers, editing and writing DNA sequences is almost as easy as manipulating text documents. And it can be done with malicious intent.

The ability to manipulate DNA was once the privilege of the select few and very limited in scope and application. Today, life scientists rely on a global supply chain and a network of computers that manipulate DNA in unprecedented ways. The time to start thinking about the security of the digital/DNA interface is now, not after a new Stuxnet-like cyberbiosecurity breach.

“All Your Company Information Technology Needs Under One Company”

3355 Lenox Road Atlanta, GA 30326

www.itgurusatl.comcustomerservice@itgurusatl.com|

(888) 511-0143 OR (706) 406-5914

“As a registered SAM.gov company, we service government entities across the entire US and Canada”

“LIKE” us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/itgurusatl / “FOLLOW US” on Twitter: www.twitter.com/itgurusatl / “CONNECT” with us on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/itgurusofatlanta/

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSFEED AND UPDATES AT: http://eepurl.com/cU_t7r

How Apple determines which emojis are frequently used

Monday, December 11th, 2017

Emojis are simple and silly, but the way that Apple figures out which emojis are popular is anything but. The company recently published the article with the emoji ranking in it on their Machine Learning Journal, and it explains how they gather big-picture data about stuff like emojis, while also protecting people’s privacy on an individual level. In a jargon-filled paper released by Apple, the company revealed a ranking of popular emojis its users send, and the big winner from that snapshot at least is the trusty old smiling face with tears of joy. The simple red heart is in second place. To do that, they use a computer science strategy called differential privacy. In short, that means adding some sort of noise to obscure the data on a person’s phone, but later that noisy data is combined with other people’s noisy data they can still understand what they’ve gathered on a big-picture level.

Imagine that you want to conduct a poll before an election to figure out what percentage of people are going to vote for the Democratic candidate, an associate professor of computer and information science at the University of Pennsylvania. Pollsters call voters and ask them who they’re going to vote for, and record it in a ledger. But if that record were to be leaked or stolen, a whole list of people’s names and party preferences would be exposed. With this method, you know which candidate might win, but you’ve put people’s privacy at risk. Now image that pollsters who, like before, still want to know which candidate will likely win, call voters and ask them a different version of the question. It starts by asking a voter to flip a coin. If that coin turns up heads, the voter is instructed to tell the truth about which party he will vote for. But if it’s tails, he is told to choose randomly between the two parties and say one of them. In other words, tails means there’s a 50 percent chance the pollster hears Republican, and 50 percent Democrat. All told, using this method, there’s a 75 percent chance the pollster hear the truth out of the voter about who he will vote for, and a 25 percent chance they hear a falsehood. There’s noise, but that noise has been added deliberately. The pollsters don’t even know if the answer they are hearing is the true one or not, only the percentage chance that it is true.

This is the general method Apple uses when figuring out trends about behavior like emoji use. “It is rooted in the idea that carefully calibrated noise can mask a user’s data,” the company writes on their machine learning blog. “When many people submit data, the noise that has been added averages out and meaningful information emerges.” Differential privacy, is an important tool when solving specific types of problems. If you’re trying to figure out if an individual has cancer and needs treatment, differential privacy is a bad strategy obviously. But if you want to know what percentage of a certain population has cancer, differential privacy could be the way to figure that out. “Differential privacy is useful when the thing you want to learn about is actually not some fact about an individual, but some statistical property of a population.

Apple explains that when people opt into sharing this kind of data with them, after the noise is applied to the data on the phone, a random encrypted sampling of it goes to an Apple server. “These records do not include device identifiers or timestamps of when events were generated. Any iOS user can choose whether to share or not: Go to Settings, then Privacy, then Analytics, and toggle “Share iPhone Analytics” off or on.

“All Your Company Information Technology Needs Under One Company”

3355 Lenox Road Atlanta, GA 30326

www.itgurusatl.comcustomerservice@itgurusatl.com|

(888) 511-0143 OR (706) 406-5914

“As a registered SAM.gov company, we service government entities across the entire US and Canada”

“LIKE” us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/itgurusatl / “FOLLOW US” on Twitter: www.twitter.com/itgurusatl / “CONNECT” with us on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/itgurusofatlanta/

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSFEED AND UPDATES AT: http://eepurl.com/cU_t7r

SMART GLASSES

Friday, December 8th, 2017

By age 45, most of us will need glasses at least for reading. That’s because our eyes’ ability to accommodate to change focus to see objects at different distances degrades with age. In young eyes, the eyeball’s crystalline lens changes shape easily, allowing this accommodation. But as we get older, this lens stiffens. Objects in close range suddenly look blurry. Hence the “readers” most middle-aged adults begin wearing on a chain or tucking in a handbag, or the bifocals worn by those who already had vision problems. But the days of popping reading glasses on and off or constantly shifting your gaze through bifocals may be numbered. Researchers at the University of Utah have developed “smart glasses” with liquid lenses that can automatically adjust their focus. “The major advantage of these smart eyeglasses is that once a person puts them on, the objects in front of the person always show clear, no matter at what distance the object is.”

Regular prescription glasses don’t fix the eyes’ accommodation problems. They simply shift the range of what’s in focus rather than expanding it. So if you put on a pair of reading glasses, the once-blurry page a foot from your eyes will be clear, but objects on the other side of the room will suddenly be blurry. The reverse is true of people who need glasses only for seeing far distances. The new smart glasses consist of lenses made of glycerin, a thick clear liquid, enclosed in flexible membranes. The membranes can be mechanically moved back and forth, changing the curvature of the glycerin lens. The lenses are set in frames containing a distance meter on the bridge, which measures the distance from the wearer’s face to nearby objects using infrared light. The meter then sends a signal to adjust the curve of the lens. This adjustment can happen quickly, letting the user focus from one object to another in 14 milliseconds.

The glasses come with a smartphone app, which uses data about the wearer’s eyeglass prescription to automatically calibrate the lenses via Bluetooth. When the wearer gets a new prescription, they can simply update the information on the app. “This means that as the person’s prescription changes, the lenses can also compensate for that, and there is no need to buy another set for quite a long time.” Though the glasses have not yet been formally tested, Mastrangelo and other members of his lab have tried them out. The current prototype is, to put it gently, bulky. Formal wearer tests are in the works.

Some adjustments will need to be made before the glasses could be ready for the market. They need to reduce the weight and thickness of the eyepieces and make the electronic subsystems smaller. They also need “much improved” styling. Mastrangelo expects to overcome these issues and have a product on shelves within two to three years.

 

 

“All Your Company Information Technology Needs Under One Company”

3355 Lenox Road Atlanta, GA 30326

www.itgurusatl.comcustomerservice@itgurusatl.com|

(888) 511-0143 OR (706) 406-5914

“As a registered SAM.gov company, we service government entities across the entire US and Canada”

“LIKE” us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/itgurusatl / “FOLLOW US” on Twitter: www.twitter.com/itgurusatl / “CONNECT” with us on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/itgurusofatlanta/

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSFEED AND UPDATES AT: http://eepurl.com/cU_t7r


Call Now To Get Started!

(888) 511-0143 or (706) 406-5914

Contact Us
close slider

Contact Form

Fields marked with an * are required